Sabre Defence add gas piston AR15 rifles to their line

| 19 February 2010 | 1 Comment

Introducing the Sabre Gas Piston rifles

gas-piston

gas-bolt-carrier

Let the industry buzz begin: Sabre Defence has just upgraded three of our top carbines with a new state-of-the-art piston system that experts are already calling the best in the business. This historic breakthrough improves weapon function and reliability in dusty desert conditions, minimizing the need for cleaning due to carbon fouling.

The Sabre M4 Tactical, M5 Tactical and Competition Deluxe are now available fitted with either our exclusive piston system, or with traditional Direct Gas Impingement (DI System).

Here’s the technical story in a nutshell. The traditional DI System has been used on every U.S. military M16 and M4 Carbine made over the past five decades. Without a doubt, it has distinguished itself as a simple and effective design. The basic idea is to vent high-pressure gas through a port in the barrel. This gas is channeled back to the bolt carrier, forcing it backward. As the bolt carrier moves, a cam rotates the bolt to unlock the action. Both the bolt and carrier continue back until a recoil spring starts pushing the carrier forward. Each time this happens, the bolt strips a live round from the magazine, pushing it up into the chamber.

This approach has stood the test of time. It is elegant in its simplicity, and doesn’t add much weight to a rifle. But there has always been one major drawback: until now, every DI System dumped hot gases, carbon fouling and powder residue right back into the receiver. The resulting buildup can cause malfunctions in the field, and dictates a rigorous cleaning regimen.

Sabre Defence solves this problem definitively with a new piston system. Its function is similar to the DI system, with one very important difference: rather than traveling back directly into the receiver, the hot gases instead push a piston and operating rod. It is this rod that moves the bolt carrier. In other words, the same potent energy still forces the bolt carrier rearward, only it now does so without dumping hot gases and fouling into the receiver. The gases are vented safely forward, away from the shooter.

Our solution greatly reduces the amount of debris that can accumulate in the receiver. It keeps the weapon cleaner, and requires less maintenance. And it does all this with the durability you’d expect from Sabre—each component is crafted from the highest-quality materials, then treated with IonBond DLC (Diamond Like Coating).  DLC is a highly advanced technology that provides an incredibly hard, corrosion-resistant surface. This means less friction, longer part life and simplified cleaning.

In some situations, these benefits can actually save lives. But then, the people of Sabre have always understood what’s at stake. This is why we’re especially proud to offer what we believe to be by far the most advanced piston-operated rifles available today.

Sabre Defence m4 Tactical Piston

M4 tactical piston carbine

The ultimate M4, new for 2010. We’ve taken our finest M4 and made it even better by adding our new short-stroke gas piston system. This means less carbon fouling, easier cleaning and lower maintenance. The result? A more dependable weapon overall.

SPECIFICATIONS

• Carbine-length gas piston system
• Free-float quadrail handguards
• Upgraded collapsible buttstock
• Single stage mil-spec trigger
• Ergonomic pistol grip• Gill brake on 16” barrels

Sabre Defence m5 Tactical Piston

M5 tactical piston carbine

New for 2010—the pinnacle of tactical carbine technology. Features our acclaimed short-stroke gas piston system. All piston parts—gas block, piston, operating rod and bolt carrier—are treated with IonBond DLC (Diamond Like Coating) for rock-solid durability.

SPECIFICATIONS

• Mid-length gas piston system
• Free-float quadrail handguards
• Upgraded collapsible buttstock
• Single stage mil-spec trigger
• Ergonomic pistol grip
• Gill brake on 16” barrels

Visit Sabre Defence

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  1. Stefan says:

    How much does it cost?

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