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  1. #1
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    Default Musgrave made firearms

    Good Day Everyone

    Does anyone perhaps know where I could get a history/article on Musgrave made firearms. I have recently seen a number of Musgrave Firearms and they are starting to grow on me. So would like to find out more about them.

    Many thanks to anyone who replies.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Musgrave made firearms

    Hi Tarmac,

    Attached find an article on the history of Musgrave rifles.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Musgrave made firearms

    Hin Bosveld

    Thanks very much for the article. It is one of Pierre van deer Walt's articles and quite informative. I was also looking for an article with more detail on actions used etc, but thanks very much.

    Warm regards
    Tarmac

  4. #4

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    Musgrave rifles have their roots in target shooting and were designed and built for full bore target shooters, in an era where surplus war rifles such as the Lee-Enfield, Lee-Metford, P14 and others dominated on shooting ranges. The accuracy and performance of these rifles made them very popular and formed a great platform for the excellent Musgrave hunting rifles which followed. Due to the fact that Musgrave’s were manufactured in the RSA, were reliable, accurate and priced very competitively, many Musgraves are still carried by those roaming Southern African hunting areas. Lyttleton RSA actions are regularly encountered on shooting ranges.
    Ben Musgrave & Sons was one of only a few commercial arms manufacturers in the period 1950 – 1989 in South Africa that could manufacture a firearm from scratch with parts manufactured within the boundaries of South Africa. In July 1970 the first ever self developed hunting rifle in South Africa was handed over to then Prime Minister B.J. Vorster. These firearms played an important role in both the sport world of shooting as well as hunting African game. Musgrave rifle are still very popular in South Africa amongst hunters the top 4 type of rifles used for hunting are the same for 2007 and 2005,namely: Musgrave (18%), Brno (13%), Sako (12%), and Mauser (7%) (van der Merwe, et.al, 2007) Although plentiful, the arms can never be replaced as Musgrave & Sons closed its doors for the last time in 1989. While I don’t collect for investment value, it is clear that one of the primary drives behind collection is to ensure that valuable or significant firearms are preserved and to ensure that the return at the end days of my collection is not less than the amount initially invested. Three models of Musgrave hunting rifles for which the RSA action served as platform were initially manufactured, namely the
    "Veld Model"
    "Vrystaat Model"
    "Presidents Model"
    There were various other models to follow. These include but is not limited to the
    LP 1000
    R- Santa B
    Mod 80
    Mod 90, Model 90 Light Rifle, Model 90 Varmint, Model 90 De Luxe Rifle
    Mini Mod 90
    Magnum Rifle
    Mod 2000
    Ambidex
    K98
    Custom rifles
    Ben Musgrave and Sons developed, built and marketed locally manufactured rifles, including a first barrel with a 4 grooves on an original Enfield barrel which normally only had two and later a barrel with a right hand twist compared to all other manufactures with a left hand twist. In 1968 the brothers Trevor and Ben (jnr) developed a bolt action on the world renowned Mauser action which enabled them to produce a 100% locally manufactured rifle. The single shot Musgrave RSA action (sometimes marked "Lyttleton RSA") that serves as the platform for these rifles are based on Mauser's design, with positive (claw) extractor. The actions have a large flat bedding area underneath and a short case extraction port which contribute to its stiffness. The original Musgrave target rifles were fitted with 26.5" barrels and designated "7, 62" (.308 Win or 7,62X51). Initially barrels from Ferlach (Austria) were used and the top parts of the barrels on these rifles were covered (encased) by the stock, while Parker Hale 1/4 MOA rear sights were installed. Later models were stocked with significant bulkier fore ends to allow for an open barrel with effective cooling while it still reduced potential fliers due to contact between the free floated barrel and the shooter's fingers. Accurate Musgrave manufactured cut rifled barrels (parallel nox) usually matched with these stocks and M&S 1/2 MOA rear sights were used. Musgrave barrels manufactured later on were all button rifled and Musgrave triggers were designed to work reliably to around a minimum of 2 pounds of pressure. The completed RSA action are sometimes found with various bolt stop configurations and is extremely hard - it will damage machining tools carelessly applied. The abundance of Musgrave firearms in South Africa demonstrates the huge number of Musgrave that were originally produced in this country.
    Musgrave rifles are still found from the Bisley range to the hunting areas of the Limpopo valley and the Western Cape Karoo areas. Originally designed from the German Mauser action to converting the barrel twist, the Musgrave family succeeded to build rifles that could compare with the best American and European built rifles. They are as much part of science and history as any other invention that is in common usage in South Africa today.


    The only Musgrave rifles built on controlled feed actions were those built on surplus K98 actions, the older Lyttelton and RSA actions and a small number of Santa Barbara actions. The Santa Barbara actions were cast copies of the forged steel K98 actions. All actions made by the Musgrave factory itself (80,83,90) were push feeds.

    The serial numbers of the rifles built on surplus K98 actions usually have 98 in the number somewhere and S98 denotes a standard style stock with no cheeck piece. L98 denotes a light stock and 22 inch barrel. The 98 light rifles were very pretty in their styling, similar to the old Lyttelton Musgrave rifles, while the Standard and De Luxe models were styled by a bunny hugger.

  5. #5
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    Default

    A friend owns a Musgrave experimental pistol.

    Things changed at the wrong time and it was never followed through with.

  6. #6
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    Are the Vektor K98 rifles the same as a Musgrave. I am in the process of buying my first hunting rifle and can get a brand new Vektor K98 in 308 for R9500.00. This price is more than any of the new Zastava, mossberg, howa etc brigade. What advice can you chaps offer me.

  7. #7

    Default

    Hi Guys,

    This is the most detailed info i could find as yet wrt to Musgrave rifles, thanks for that. I have grown up with 2 of them, one a 30-06 and the other a 270, both " Presidents models " When my son (15) started to show his interest in hunting, I decided that it was time to buy our own rifle. i was adviced by an PH to consider a 7x57 for it's combination of mild recoil and well known ballistic characteristics. Long and short of the story: I found one, a Musgrave Deluxe in imacculate condition, but lost it again in a still misterious deal....i then found a Musgrave 30-06 model D98 in a good condition, and bought it. It came home 3 weeks ago fitted with a new Lynx 3-9x42. Took it out to the shooting range and was satisfied with it's grouping of +- 40 mm at 100m. in my out of practice hands. My only problem/gripe is with the action, it is not nearly as sleek as other actions i have handled before, including the Musgrave RSA action and most definitly not as smooth as a Lee Enfield .303 action that i have handled a few days ago. Someone told me that the 98 actions are less smooth than other actions. i cannot see any visible wear on either the bolt or the slide area. Any opinion on this ? Also does anybody know roughly when the Model D98 was manufactued ? Any information wrt to this rifle or action will be much appricated.

  8. #8
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    Default

    musgrave also tried their hands in some interesting military projects. although post 1994 musgrave never reached the heights it did before, there was several options with musgrave of which closing it down, was one of the last options.

    there was even a local interest from a very famous and rich sa family to buy musgrave from the state. another option was to downsize musgrave severely and then concentrate on popular calibres and some custom jobs. and some other options as well. guess which option the anc government took.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ianoli4 View Post
    Hi Guys,

    This is the most detailed info i could find as yet wrt to Musgrave rifles, thanks for that. I have grown up with 2 of them, one a 30-06 and the other a 270, both " Presidents models " When my son (15) started to show his interest in hunting, I decided that it was time to buy our own rifle. i was adviced by an PH to consider a 7x57 for it's combination of mild recoil and well known ballistic characteristics. Long and short of the story: I found one, a Musgrave Deluxe in imacculate condition, but lost it again in a still misterious deal....i then found a Musgrave 30-06 model D98 in a good condition, and bought it. It came home 3 weeks ago fitted with a new Lynx 3-9x42. Took it out to the shooting range and was satisfied with it's grouping of +- 40 mm at 100m. in my out of practice hands. My only problem/gripe is with the action, it is not nearly as sleek as other actions i have handled before, including the Musgrave RSA action and most definitly not as smooth as a Lee Enfield .303 action that i have handled a few days ago. Someone told me that the 98 actions are less smooth than other actions. i cannot see any visible wear on either the bolt or the slide area. Any opinion on this ? Also does anybody know roughly when the Model D98 was manufactued ? Any information wrt to this rifle or action will be much appricated.
    7 x 57 SP , that's the Sh1t, I have one called Lucy, shoots like a dream. My 308 Musgrave is called Betsy. I prefer Lucy over Betsy

  10. #10
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    Default

    the article on musgrave is not that correct

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