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  1. #1
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    Default Portuguese Mauser

    Hey Guys So my dad has a
    Portuguese Mauser 6.5 before that is was his grandfathers its really old. He doesnt want to renew the license coming up and is looking to sell it. Any advise on collectors in cape town that will be able to give it a value and will buy it? Oh i also found 5 boxes of 10 rounds.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Portuguese Mauser

    R3000-R6000 depending condition, originality etc.

    Please check the results of recent Classic Arms sales as well.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Portuguese Mauser

    Condition of the barrel?

    I still shoot mine on a regular basis. Extremely accurate and mild recoil.

    Try Gert Odendaal he might be interested.

    Classic Arms good idea.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Portuguese Mauser

    Quote Originally Posted by Theunsb View Post
    Condition of the barrel?

    I still shoot mine on a regular basis. Extremely accurate and mild recoil.

    Try Gert Odendaal he might be interested.

    Classic Arms good idea.
    Theuns thank you , at this stage I am concentrating on 1871/84 Black Powder Mausers. This is the type of rifles I want to accumulate to use in my black powder hunts and collections/exhibitions.
    I am sure Matt will get a buyer, Matt keep in mind that the market for these old great rifles are small, do not expect to sell it for a huge sum of money, like Ds. J pointed out between R3000- R5000 will be a good price to sell for. If you reload, it is easy to fire form brass, a few knowledgeable rifle collectors will guide you through this process if you decides to keep it, but please , if you keep it , use it as much as possible, we owe it to these old stalwarts, they do not build them like that anymore...

  5. #5

    Default Re: Portuguese Mauser

    Hi Matt
    If you looking to sell 1 of the boxes of cartridges separately, let me know, I would like to add to my cartridge collection.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Portuguese Mauser

    Quote Originally Posted by Gert Odendaal View Post
    Theuns thank you , at this stage I am concentrating on 1871/84 Black Powder Mausers. This is the type of rifles I want to accumulate to use in my black powder hunts and collections/exhibitions.
    I am sure Matt will get a buyer, Matt keep in mind that the market for these old great rifles are small, do not expect to sell it for a huge sum of money, like Ds. J pointed out between R3000- R5000 will be a good price to sell for. If you reload, it is easy to fire form brass, a few knowledgeable rifle collectors will guide you through this process if you decides to keep it, but please , if you keep it , use it as much as possible, we owe it to these old stalwarts, they do not build them like that anymore...
    Thanks Gert I’ll ask him if he maybe wants to hang onto it. It hasn’t had a round in about 40 years think I must take it too get a good clean and try find some rounds for it to see how it fires. 6.5 must surely go for miles.


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    Default Re: Portuguese Mauser

    Quote Originally Posted by mattb View Post
    Thanks Gert I’ll ask him if he maybe wants to hang onto it. It hasn’t had a round in about 40 years think I must take it too get a good clean and try find some rounds for it to see how it fires. 6.5 must surely go for miles.
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    If he still hunts , this really is a great bush caliber as well as `n more open plains rifle ..it really is a great hunting rifle...as I pointed out we are only custodians of these great old stalwarts, you never possess a rifle, we just take care of them, any rifle will outlast/out grown a hunter, it is up to us to guard and treasure our rifles as custodians.

    Some info:
    The Mauser–Vergueiro was a bolt-action rifle, designed in 1904 by José Alberto Vergueiro, an infantry officer of the Portuguese Army, and manufactured by Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). It was developed from the Mauser 98 rifle with the introduction of a new bolt system derived from the Gewehr 1888 and Mannlicher–Schönauer. Outside Portugal, the weapon was also known as the Portuguese Mauser. It used the 6.5×58mm Vergueiro, a cartridge developed specially for it.[1]
    The weapon replaced the Kropatschek m/1886 as the standard infantry rifle of the Portuguese Army in 1904, remaining in service until it was replaced by the Mauser 98k in 1939. In Portuguese service the weapon was officially designated Espingarda 6,5 mm m/1904 ("Rifle 6.5mm m/1904"). A lighter and shorter version of the weapon was classified as a carbine and designated Carabina 6,5 mm m/1904 ("Carbine 6.5mm m/1904"). A total of 100,000 rifles were produced for Portugal. An additional 5,000 Mauser–Vergueiro rifles, chambered in 7×57mm Mauser, were produced in 1906 for Brazil's Federal Police, using leftover components from the Portuguese order and issued in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. In 1915, 20,000 of Portugal's Mauser–Vergueiro rifles were sold to South Africa, which had insufficient Lee–Enfield SMLE rifles to supply all of its troops.[1]
    In Portuguese and South African service it was used in combat in the First World Warand in several colonial campaigns. The German colonial troops in East Africa also used Mauser–Vergueiro rifles, captured from the allied forces in combat. The Portuguese Expeditionary Corps on the Western Front used British weapons and equipment for logistical reasons, and so did not use the Vergueiro. Although Portugal was neutral in World War II, in 1942 Portuguese forces briefly fought against the Japanese occupation of Portuguese Timor using Kropatschek rifles[1]
    In 1939, after the Portuguese Army had adopted the 7.92×57mm Mauser 98k as the m/937, many of the remaining Mauser–Vergueiro rifles were modified to chamber the new standard cartridge. The modified rifles were called Espingarda 8 mm m/1904-39.[1] Markings on the modified rifles remained unchanged with the exception of the caliber designation "6,5" being stamped over on some rifles with two "X" marks. This was apparently done by individual Portuguese armorers rather than as standard practice.
    The 7.92x57mm Mauser–Vergueiro rifle was kept in limited use in the Portuguese Army until the middle 1960s, mainly in some Overseas units.


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Portuguese Mauser

    Quote Originally Posted by Gert Odendaal View Post
    If he still hunts , this really is a great bush caliber as well as `n more open plains rifle ..it really is a great hunting rifle...as I pointed out we are only custodians of these great old stalwarts, you never possess a rifle, we just take care of them, any rifle will outlast/out grown a hunter, it is up to us to guard and treasure our rifles as custodians.

    Some info:
    The Mauser–Vergueiro was a bolt-action rifle, designed in 1904 by José Alberto Vergueiro, an infantry officer of the Portuguese Army, and manufactured by Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). It was developed from the Mauser 98 rifle with the introduction of a new bolt system derived from the Gewehr 1888 and Mannlicher–Schönauer. Outside Portugal, the weapon was also known as the Portuguese Mauser. It used the 6.5×58mm Vergueiro, a cartridge developed specially for it.[1]
    The weapon replaced the Kropatschek m/1886 as the standard infantry rifle of the Portuguese Army in 1904, remaining in service until it was replaced by the Mauser 98k in 1939. In Portuguese service the weapon was officially designated Espingarda 6,5 mm m/1904 ("Rifle 6.5mm m/1904"). A lighter and shorter version of the weapon was classified as a carbine and designated Carabina 6,5 mm m/1904 ("Carbine 6.5mm m/1904"). A total of 100,000 rifles were produced for Portugal. An additional 5,000 Mauser–Vergueiro rifles, chambered in 7×57mm Mauser, were produced in 1906 for Brazil's Federal Police, using leftover components from the Portuguese order and issued in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. In 1915, 20,000 of Portugal's Mauser–Vergueiro rifles were sold to South Africa, which had insufficient Lee–Enfield SMLE rifles to supply all of its troops.[1]
    In Portuguese and South African service it was used in combat in the First World Warand in several colonial campaigns. The German colonial troops in East Africa also used Mauser–Vergueiro rifles, captured from the allied forces in combat. The Portuguese Expeditionary Corps on the Western Front used British weapons and equipment for logistical reasons, and so did not use the Vergueiro. Although Portugal was neutral in World War II, in 1942 Portuguese forces briefly fought against the Japanese occupation of Portuguese Timor using Kropatschek rifles[1]
    In 1939, after the Portuguese Army had adopted the 7.92×57mm Mauser 98k as the m/937, many of the remaining Mauser–Vergueiro rifles were modified to chamber the new standard cartridge. The modified rifles were called Espingarda 8 mm m/1904-39.[1] Markings on the modified rifles remained unchanged with the exception of the caliber designation "6,5" being stamped over on some rifles with two "X" marks. This was apparently done by individual Portuguese armorers rather than as standard practice.
    The 7.92x57mm Mauser–Vergueiro rifle was kept in limited use in the Portuguese Army until the middle 1960s, mainly in some Overseas units.

    Thanks very much Gert for the useful info.


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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Portuguese Mauser

    Quote Originally Posted by Gert Odendaal View Post
    If he still hunts , this really is a great bush caliber as well as `n more open plains rifle ..it really is a great hunting rifle...as I pointed out we are only custodians of these great old stalwarts, you never possess a rifle, we just take care of them, any rifle will outlast/out grown a hunter, it is up to us to guard and treasure our rifles as custodians.

    Some info:
    The Mauser–Vergueiro was a bolt-action rifle, designed in 1904 by José Alberto Vergueiro, an infantry officer of the Portuguese Army, and manufactured by Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). It was developed from the Mauser 98 rifle with the introduction of a new bolt system derived from the Gewehr 1888 and Mannlicher–Schönauer. Outside Portugal, the weapon was also known as the Portuguese Mauser. It used the 6.5×58mm Vergueiro, a cartridge developed specially for it.[1]
    The weapon replaced the Kropatschek m/1886 as the standard infantry rifle of the Portuguese Army in 1904, remaining in service until it was replaced by the Mauser 98k in 1939. In Portuguese service the weapon was officially designated Espingarda 6,5 mm m/1904 ("Rifle 6.5mm m/1904"). A lighter and shorter version of the weapon was classified as a carbine and designated Carabina 6,5 mm m/1904 ("Carbine 6.5mm m/1904"). A total of 100,000 rifles were produced for Portugal. An additional 5,000 Mauser–Vergueiro rifles, chambered in 7×57mm Mauser, were produced in 1906 for Brazil's Federal Police, using leftover components from the Portuguese order and issued in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. In 1915, 20,000 of Portugal's Mauser–Vergueiro rifles were sold to South Africa, which had insufficient Lee–Enfield SMLE rifles to supply all of its troops.[1]
    In Portuguese and South African service it was used in combat in the First World Warand in several colonial campaigns. The German colonial troops in East Africa also used Mauser–Vergueiro rifles, captured from the allied forces in combat. The Portuguese Expeditionary Corps on the Western Front used British weapons and equipment for logistical reasons, and so did not use the Vergueiro. Although Portugal was neutral in World War II, in 1942 Portuguese forces briefly fought against the Japanese occupation of Portuguese Timor using Kropatschek rifles[1]
    In 1939, after the Portuguese Army had adopted the 7.92×57mm Mauser 98k as the m/937, many of the remaining Mauser–Vergueiro rifles were modified to chamber the new standard cartridge. The modified rifles were called Espingarda 8 mm m/1904-39.[1] Markings on the modified rifles remained unchanged with the exception of the caliber designation "6,5" being stamped over on some rifles with two "X" marks. This was apparently done by individual Portuguese armorers rather than as standard practice.
    The 7.92x57mm Mauser–Vergueiro rifle was kept in limited use in the Portuguese Army until the middle 1960s, mainly in some Overseas units.

    Good info here, thanks Gert.

    I would like to express the opinion, that these rifles were erroniously called Mausers due to 2 things:
    1. They were made by DWM in Berlin, who also made Mauser rifles (and owned the Mauser trade mark).
    2. The bolt stop/ejector assembly looks like it was borrowed from a Mauser rifle. (Not strange considering who manufactured it.)

    The action with split rear reciever ring is clearly based on the Mannlicher design.

    These rifles were intended for lower pressures than what modern cartridges can generate. Do not try to push velocities up or rebarrel them to a modern cartridge. It could have serious consequences.

    Scope mounting is a challenge, and likely to weaken the action even further. So stick with the open sights and use it at appropriate ranges.

    Value is fairly low, especially in well used condition.

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