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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Article: "New Zealand bans assault weapons, triggering similar calls in US"

    Quote Originally Posted by pblaauw View Post
    Friend of mine emigrated there a while ago...aptly calls it the worlds largest old age home... how much crime do they really have?
    Thankfully very little serious crime (armed robbery, rape, murder).

    https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/natio...eaths-revealed

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Article: "New Zealand bans assault weapons, triggering similar calls in US"

    An update from "down under". The latest on this is effectively "situation no change" since the new legislation received Royal Assent several weeks ago.

    All centrefire semi-automatics are banned, as are rimfire semi-automatics with a magazine capacity in excess of 10 rounds. Also banned are pump / semi shotguns with a capacity exceeding 5 rounds. These, their accessories, magazines etc are now classed as prohibited firearms and prohibited parts.

    You may be aware that a confiscation with compensation scheme was announced but specific details of this are still yet to be made public. There is a general belief that the government has miscalculated just how much of tax payer's money they will need to use in order to ensure compliance. This at a time when people like teachers from government schools are striking for better pay... A "well being" budget is set to be announced on Thursday.

    As it stands now, there is an amnesty in place. We can retain our firearms and use them on private property, following which the options are:

    1. Surrender with no compensation (pffft)
    2. Hand in and a dealer / suitable person will evaluate its worth. Rumour has it that there'll be a list of parts, firearms and a price to be paid for each.
    3. Retain firearms on existing "C" (collector) endorsement, similar rules apply - to be stored in an inoperable condition*
    4. Apply for "C" (collector) endorsement if firearm is of "historic value" - pretty subjective!

    *Those rules apply to restricted weapons (machine guns, mortars, etc) but semi-automatic centrefires are now prohibited firearms the new legislation states that a critical part is to be removed and stored at a separate address would you believe!

    The specific details about how that's meant to work was not covered in the first tranche of amendments to the Arms Act 1983. The second tranche is due, I think in June. The expectation is that lawmakers (on advice from police national HQ) will go full retard. Full registration, calibre restrictions, ammunition quantity restrictions, banning of private sales, reduced licence validity period, more intrusive vetting for new applicants and probably going to try monkey around with pistol shooters and collectors.

    The sport shooting community is holding out faint hope that the government might baulk at the cost of the confiscation and grant sport shooting as an exception to possession. The bad news unfortunately keeps rolling in, today witnessed the launch of NZ's version of GFSA: http://www.guncontrol.nz/ and on FB: https://www.facebook.com/GunControlNZ/

    They are heavily moderating commentary on their StasiBook page, basically removing anything that they feel runs counter to their point of view. I'm sure this sounds familiar.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Article: "New Zealand bans assault weapons, triggering similar calls in US"

    I have a ton of mates who have moved to NZ, and apart from it being beautiful they have all said they are shocked by the drug culture amongst the youth especially MDMA etc.

    i say this because i find it ironic that a Nation with one of the worlds highest suicide rates, has taken a stance on firearms where more people are damaging themselves

    not sure what impact the drug usage has on these figures but surely they should be looking at other matters other than firearms

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Article: "New Zealand bans assault weapons, triggering similar calls in US"

    Quote Originally Posted by GAZZAMCK View Post
    I have a ton of mates who have moved to NZ, and apart from it being beautiful they have all said they are shocked by the drug culture amongst the youth especially MDMA etc.

    i say this because i find it ironic that a Nation with one of the worlds highest suicide rates, has taken a stance on firearms where more people are damaging themselves

    not sure what impact the drug usage has on these figures but surely they should be looking at other matters other than firearms
    Yes, there is a rampant methamphetamine problem in NZ. Firearms are a convenient distraction from the real issues.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Article: "New Zealand bans assault weapons, triggering similar calls in US"

    NZ should pay more attention to the prevalence of Chlamydia in kids are young as 8 and also having about the highest rate of infection in the first world.
    live out your imagination , not your history.

  6. #26
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tango Sierra View Post
    An update from "down under". The latest on this is effectively "situation no change" since the new legislation received Royal Assent several weeks ago.

    All centrefire semi-automatics are banned, as are rimfire semi-automatics with a magazine capacity in excess of 10 rounds. Also banned are pump / semi shotguns with a capacity exceeding 5 rounds. These, their accessories, magazines etc are now classed as prohibited firearms and prohibited parts.

    You may be aware that a confiscation with compensation scheme was announced but specific details of this are still yet to be made public. There is a general belief that the government has miscalculated just how much of tax payer's money they will need to use in order to ensure compliance. This at a time when people like teachers from government schools are striking for better pay... A "well being" budget is set to be announced on Thursday.

    As it stands now, there is an amnesty in place. We can retain our firearms and use them on private property, following which the options are:

    1. Surrender with no compensation (pffft)
    2. Hand in and a dealer / suitable person will evaluate its worth. Rumour has it that there'll be a list of parts, firearms and a price to be paid for each.
    3. Retain firearms on existing "C" (collector) endorsement, similar rules apply - to be stored in an inoperable condition*
    4. Apply for "C" (collector) endorsement if firearm is of "historic value" - pretty subjective!

    *Those rules apply to restricted weapons (machine guns, mortars, etc) but semi-automatic centrefires are now prohibited firearms the new legislation states that a critical part is to be removed and stored at a separate address would you believe!

    The specific details about how that's meant to work was not covered in the first tranche of amendments to the Arms Act 1983. The second tranche is due, I think in June. The expectation is that lawmakers (on advice from police national HQ) will go full retard. Full registration, calibre restrictions, ammunition quantity restrictions, banning of private sales, reduced licence validity period, more intrusive vetting for new applicants and probably going to try monkey around with pistol shooters and collectors.

    The sport shooting community is holding out faint hope that the government might baulk at the cost of the confiscation and grant sport shooting as an exception to possession. The bad news unfortunately keeps rolling in, today witnessed the launch of NZ's version of GFSA: http://www.guncontrol.nz/ and on FB: https://www.facebook.com/GunControlNZ/

    They are heavily moderating commentary on their StasiBook page, basically removing anything that they feel runs counter to their point of view. I'm sure this sounds familiar.
    Sounds like you have all the right ingredients for a nice socialist state. They should just ban liberty and get it over with. :(

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Article: "New Zealand bans assault weapons, triggering similar calls in US"

    Quote Originally Posted by WCC View Post
    Sounds like you have all the right ingredients for a nice socialist state. They should just ban liberty and get it over with. :(
    Oh don't worry, they're trying - the socialist government and their hard left cronies in the Greens are pushing for new "hate speech" laws. What's equally concerning is the silence from the opposition (who were also in lockstep with the recent firearm ban) in this regard. In fact the only voice in parliament to offer any opposition is from the Act party (1 seat).

    It's indeed quite a cocktail of warning signs.

  8. #28

    Default Re: Article: "New Zealand bans assault weapons, triggering similar calls in US"

    Skyped a good friend of mine last night in NZ he said the general consensus from the public is the government can shove it , they tax them , then use that tax money that should be spent on real governmental necessities is now being used to pay for semi autos. The figures are so crooked from what they state on media to what it actually is

  9. #29

    Default Re: Article: "New Zealand bans assault weapons, triggering similar calls in US"

    Can AR-15 owners avoid the gun ban with pump-action modifications? Not even police know

    https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-...en-police-know

    Gun owners are calling on police to clear up confusion over whether banned high powered assault rifles can be modified to comply with the new firearms law.

    It comes as a New Zealand importer considers bringing in an AR-15 modification kit, known as the Animus, which can convert the gun from a semi-automatic weapon to pump-action. The AR-15 was the primary weapon system used during the Christchurch mosque attacks.

    The converted pump-action AR-15 has a limited capacity and fires slowly, with every bullet pulled into the chamber manually by hand in a similar fashion to a shotgun. It was designed by an American company to comply with their own gun legislation.

    There is room under the Government’s gun reform for modifications to make a prohibited firearm legal. However, police are yet to specify exactly how this should be carried out.

    Police were unable to confirm whether the AR-15 modification kit was legal when contacted by 1 NEWS today. In a statement, they said they were ”currently looking into the feasibility of modifying these particular firearms”.

    Christchurch gunsmith Andrew Bakker, who runs Phantom Gunsmiths, said it was technically possible to convert an AR-15 for a range of different uses, including a smaller .22 calibre and pump or bolt action.

    “AR-15's are built so people can convert them to long-range rifles or specialty rifles — depending on what they want them for ⁠— straight out of the box. They have an upper and lower and you can swap parts in and out,” he said.

    A representative for the Council of Licenced Firearm Owners, Nicole McKee, said owners were looking to modify where they could because the “true value” of their guns weren’t being met in the buy-back.

    “People will be looking at other avenues of being able to retain their firearms in a legal configuration so they can continue to keep them, use them and not be out of pocket for handing them in,” she said.

    “We are looking for a fair and reasonable approach to all of this and it's really important that the Government and police have a fair and reasonable approach.”

    However, Nik Green of the reform advocacy group Gun Control NZ said the conversions aren’t permanent.

    “Guns are modular tools, you can take them apart, you can swap pieces in and out and what that means in practise is that a semi-automatic weapon that's been converted into a pump-action or a bolt action can easily be converted back again,” he said.

    “We would discourage people from doing this. There are opportunities to bring in prohibited weapons, get compensation and buy totally compliant weapons through the buy-back scheme.”

    The AR-15 is just one part of the discussion. Many want to convert their banned hunting and sporting rifles, but don't know how.

    Gunsmith Andrew Bakker said he's received at least 50 inquiries.

    “It's going to be your .22 bolt action rifles that have more than 10 shots, or antique lever action rifles that have more than 10 shots, they're the ones that I've been messaged about the most,” he said.

    “Lots of these rifles are collectible, I know people who have got rifles who have come back from WW1 and WW2 that have got a historic significance, and they don't want to see them put through the shredder.”

    The question now is whether, with all this confusion, gun owners will stay at home when the buy-back begins in Christchurch on Saturday.

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