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Thread: When to draw

  1. #1
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    Default When to draw

    I'm a new firearm owner and my biggest fear is landing up in trouble for drawing/using my firearm and the judge feels deadly force was not justified.

    Yeah, someone breaks into my house, I'm pretty sure of the laws on that, but let's say I'm driving home at night, stop at a red robot and someone gets out the car in front of me and starts walking towards me. I have no way out and boxed in.
    Do I draw and get ready for an attack but keep my firearm hidden? Do I shout and tell h I'm armed and he must keep his distance? Do I draw, and point because I feel threatened? Do I keep holstered, and see what happens? Maybe I'm about to get hijacked, maybe he's coming to tell me my headlight is broken.

    A user posted on here that his wife was being threatened with a brick. He didn't go into too much detail but the judge didn't feel it was justified to draw. I would think it was. Maybe I would have shot the guy. A brick to the head could be life threatening.

    Does anyone have any scenarios when they have drawn/shot someone and not been in too much trouble?
    Would love to hear, besides the obvious housebreaking, hijacking etc.

    I'm sure this has been discussed, but couldn't find a link.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: When to draw

    For me the draw comes very shortly before the shot if the gun needs to come out shit is hitting the fan and there is no need to advertise beforehand

  3. #3
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    Default Re: When to draw

    Okay. So as per the book. Wait for the attack, you 100% sure it's going to happen and hope you have enough time to draw and pull the trigger.

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    Default Re: When to draw

    Circumstances differ, but for me, living on a farm, if a “feeling” (I believe we develop a sense of syrange sounds, events etc) is perceived, I draw. Gun in hand is far better than in holster. Above meaning in privacy and outbof public eye.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: When to draw

    There is almost no clear and definite answer, simply because what you experience and what the judge thinks might differ quite a lot. Also, you might see one thing which ciuld turn out completely different.

    One thing: get a dashcam or similar device to prove your side of the story.

    One may pull the gun but keep it under cover, or out of sight until it is necessary to use it.

    Remember that guns are often frowned on by society, and you might face a charge for pointing a firearm. Even more reason to keep it concealed - even though it might be justified. The other person just needs to say that you started it.

    Your firearm should be the proverbial ace-in-the-hole. Keep it concealed.

    Your actions should depend on the situation.

    Do mental preparation.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: When to draw

    Drawing of the firearm goes with shooting the firearm. The FA is not a devise for threatening somebody. For that you have pepper spray.

    Drawing your FA is your last resort, and as such learn and train to get out of situations, observe to prevent getting boxed in and exercise so that you can win the fight/foot race with 100m.

    Scenarios will differ from situation to situation, the SAP member on scene, the Prosecutor and very important the Magistrate.

    Last thought, is drawing the firearm worth the trouble your will get? If your life is threatened yes, if the bloke throws your car with a brick maybe not yes.

    Sent from my SM-J530F using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    Default Re: When to draw

    Quote Originally Posted by flyinggun View Post
    Drawing of the firearm goes with shooting the firearm. The FA is not a devise for threatening somebody. For that you have pepper spray.

    Drawing your FA is your last resort, and as such learn and train to get out of situations, observe to prevent getting boxed in and exercise so that you can win the fight/foot race with 100m.

    Scenarios will differ from situation to situation, the SAP member on scene, the Prosecutor and very important the Magistrate.

    Last thought, is drawing the firearm worth the trouble your will get? If your life is threatened yes, if the bloke throws your car with a brick maybe not yes.

    Sent from my SM-J530F using Tapatalk
    Thanks, and yeah, totally agree.
    I find myself watching a lot of youtube channels like active self-defense. They talk a lot about situational awareness and getting out of the area as a first resort.
    I've also seen how fast things can escalate, hence me asking the question.

    I guess it comes with experience.
    Luckily I have managed to get through life pretty unscathed, but have been in a couple of close calls. Always managing to escape, fight or talk my way out of it.
    I do sometimes wonder if I had a firearm if things may have had a very different ending.

    Thanks for the replies, i guess i just need more training and experience.
    I did obviously buy the firearm like i would assume 99,9% of us on here hoping to never ever have to use it in a real situation.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: When to draw

    In 1997 I got my snubby and started edc'ing immediately. A short time later (maybe two weeks?) I overtook a taxi. To the best of my knowledge I didn't do anything wrong but shortly before the next stop two taxi overtook me and boxed me in. The overtaken taxi stopped behind me. The driver got out, walked up to my door and started accusing me of reckless driving in quite an aggressive manner.

    Since the bakkie is a 4x4 and quite high he could not see into the cabin, I slowly got out my revolver with my left hand and kept it beneath my right arm pit.

    I am to this day sure that he wanted to provoke me into aggressive behaviour, and that the other two taxis were part of his plan because the people inside were watching very closely.

    He continued his verbal attack for a time (might have been mere seconds but it felt like ages) and I sat still, just observing him and the onlookers in the taxis.

    Somewhere along the line I realised what his game plan was and decided to do nothing. I sat and told him to drive away.

    Eventually he left me and the taxis drove off. I was still shaking when I had lunch a few hours later. He never knew that I was armed. It would have been my last resort.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: When to draw

    Draw as a last resort, and practice the draw, practice while sitting in your car, at you desk, on the couch, basically everywhere...
    I believe that if you draw in public a little bit too early "before" the attack happens and there are witnesses you going to have a kak-ish time in court because witnesses ALWAYS see things in different ways ,believe me, I have been in court for an assault case (criminal charges withdrawn against me) and then ended up in the South Gauteng high court as a civil case and every witness, even the ones in my favor, saw "different" things, also the trial judge found in my favor but the appeal judges wanted to hang me, so if you draw in public, be sure.
    At home on the other hand or a place with no witnesses, feel free to draw if you feel scared or threatened...

  10. #10
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    Default Re: When to draw

    Quote Originally Posted by Ds J View Post
    In 1997 I got my snubby and started edc'ing immediately. A short time later (maybe two weeks?) I overtook a taxi. To the best of my knowledge I didn't do anything wrong but shortly before the next stop two taxi overtook me and boxed me in. The overtaken taxi stopped behind me. The driver got out, walked up to my door and started accusing me of reckless driving in quite an aggressive manner.

    Since the bakkie is a 4x4 and quite high he could not see into the cabin, I slowly got out my revolver with my left hand and kept it beneath my right arm pit.

    I am to this day sure that he wanted to provoke me into aggressive behaviour, and that the other two taxis were part of his plan because the people inside were watching very closely.

    He continued his verbal attack for a time (might have been mere seconds but it felt like ages) and I sat still, just observing him and the onlookers in the taxis.

    Somewhere along the line I realised what his game plan was and decided to do nothing. I sat and told him to drive away.

    Eventually he left me and the taxis drove off. I was still shaking when I had lunch a few hours later. He never knew that I was armed. It would have been my last resort.
    Thanks for the share.
    Do you feel you would have done something different today after another 20 years+ experience?

    I would say you did the right thing, but that's just my opinion.
    If for some reason you did get spotted, a judge may feel very different to you drawing (although you didn't point) on an "unarmed" man.

    Its a massive responsibility, and there are no clear cut do's and don'ts.

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