Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Under the Jackalberry.
    Age
    52
    Posts
    6,985

    Default Re: Educated opinions and experience with Peregrine monolithic bullets

    I have not used the Perigrines yet, but have some experience with other brands of monolithic expanding bullets. So here is what I can add:

    Gyroscopic stability is quite important for bullet accuracy and terminal performance. This is largely determined by the barrel twist rate and bullet length. Note: length, not weight. Since copper has a lower density than lead, mono bullets tend to be lighter for the same length, compared to cup-core types.

    For a 1:10" twist 308, I would keep the weight of a spitzer-type mono bullet at 150gn or below. This will not only ensure stable flight, but also help to reduce the risk of a bullet tumbling after impact. Nose-forward penetration is usually deeper and straighter, and helps ensure proper expansion. Do not fall into the trap of using the same weight of mono bullets, as you would have with conventional cup-core types.

    Another thing to consider is that mono bullets are quite tough and therefore much less forgiving of barrel tolerance issues. This means that some rifles will just not shoot them well, no matter what tricks you try. So do try them in your rifle, but do not think that accuracy will be guaranteed. Just like their owners, rifles have personal preferences too.

  2. #22
    User
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    51
    Posts
    7,131

    Default Re: Educated opinions and experience with Peregrine monolithic bullets

    driepootx
    The OP uses a 20 inch 308. Here I would advise bullets in the 120-130gr range to get speed and better expansion. With the longer (heavier) bullets stabilisation becomes a problem and a mono that tumbles creates serious blood on the impact side.
    Bullet stabilization is particularly vital when using mono bullets, folk keep on trying for the heaviest mono than can, you better off with a lighter mono than trying to stabilize a maximum weight bullet. These marginally stabilized bullets inevitably tumble (turn 180Deg actually - no tumbling) shortly after terminal ballistics start.

  3. #23
    User
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Age
    51
    Posts
    7,131

    Default Re: Educated opinions and experience with Peregrine monolithic bullets

    [QUOTE=A-R;1312992]I have not used the Perigrines yet, but have some experience with other brands of monolithic expanding bullets. So here is what I can add................
    ......................
    Hi AR - I see you answered pretty much same as me ..... I left page open to respond later and you responded between. One thing I wish to add to your well constructed post, "this means that some rifles will not shoot them well, no matter what tricks .......
    GS Custom will after measuring your barrel make your bullets a few thou bigger if needed, most rifles that do not like mono bullets are of the largest permitted QC bore size. If I recall Peregrine is also willing to cater for such barrels.

  4. #24
    Member Messor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    BFN Freestate
    Age
    40
    Posts
    9,883

    Default Re: Educated opinions and experience with Peregrine monolithic bullets

    Quote Originally Posted by Cbotha15 View Post
    Good day,

    Like the title says I need some advice on hunting bullets for game ranging from impala up to kudu and BwB mostly in the bushveld environment.
    The rifle I have is a Remington 700 chambered in .308Win with a 20" heavy barrel with a 1/10" twist.
    Hunting is easy, even bullet selection for hunting is easy, that said just a couple of pointers.
    I see you mentioned VRG3 bullets later in this thread as well, and one must be clear about the advantages and disadvantages about such a selection.

    The advantage would be that you can shoot a heavy mono, like the 180gr VRG3.
    You would really fully stabilize that thing, and probably shoot through most eland.

    That said, I am not convinced it's the best setup.
    With its monolithic construction you are not really chasing penetration, also you give up a lot more than you gain. For example let's say you are a one bullet guy, and you load one of the VRG3 offerings, that would not be an all-rounder in my opinion. I have shot bullets of similar BC and they drop like bricks. I personally cannot see the advantage in this cal for the VRG3 over the VLR4. I would load a VLR4 and be done with it, hunt bushveld very happily and take the rifle plains hunting the odd day you have the opportunity without changing anything.

    You can load a very light mono, and when you hit bones at short distance you will still have severe meat damage, that is the reality of the situation, it's not magically going to avoid bones up close. I would say go for something like the 150gr VLR4, shoot it at 2650ft/s and be done with it. You see even at sea level you will sit with an SG of 1.88(stability factor). Most 308 shooters in the world knows of a 165gr bullet at 2650ft/s, it's been killing things successfully for decades. 2650ft/s does not blow something up at very short range, and it's more than enough for normal plains hunting.

    Both the 130gr and 150gr mono's will work in the 308, both will make it a versatile combo, but when I look at big bones like in BWB and Eland I personally would like the latter.
    "It's not the dying part that scares me, it's the not living."

  5. #25
    User
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    On the Gariep
    Posts
    2,870

    Default Re: Educated opinions and experience with Peregrine monolithic bullets

    Messor. While I agree that the VLR-4 is a better choice for a general hunting bullet I do believe that the VRG-3 have a (rather specialized) use. It is not a good choice if you are shooting past 200m, I have used it out to 200, however, I think that that is its maximum useful range. What I do like about it, for thick bush where you lose sight of the animal you shot very quickly, is the fact that it punches a large, clean hole. In all the animals that I shot the bullet exited but even if it doesn't, a lot of blood escapes through the entry hole making tracking easier.

    In appropriate calibers it will probably make a great buffalo bullet.

    The impala in the photos were facing away at a strong angle, these pictures are off the entry wound.





    Entry wound on a young eland bull, I wiped away some of the blood to get a photo of the bullet hole.



    Entry wound on a warthog.


  6. #26
    Member Messor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    BFN Freestate
    Age
    40
    Posts
    9,883

    Default Re: Educated opinions and experience with Peregrine monolithic bullets

    Jip, flat nose bullets tend to do that :


    Entrance ^^


    Exit ^^


    Tis what happens on the inside that matters :)
    "It's not the dying part that scares me, it's the not living."

  7. #27
    User
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    On the Gariep
    Posts
    2,870

    Default Re: Educated opinions and experience with Peregrine monolithic bullets

    Quote Originally Posted by Messor View Post
    Tis what happens on the inside that matters :)
    True. The eland moved 50m from where it was shot, none of the other animals made it further than 30m. Seems like the right thing happens on the inside too, with this bullet. Plus you have a decent blood trail should you need it. Not that I needed it here, I saw all of the animals go down but I was not hunting in thick bush.

  8. #28
    Member Messor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    BFN Freestate
    Age
    40
    Posts
    9,883

    Default Re: Educated opinions and experience with Peregrine monolithic bullets

    Quote Originally Posted by TStone View Post
    True. The eland moved 50m from where it was shot, none of the other animals made it further than 30m. Seems like the right thing happens on the inside too, with this bullet. Plus you have a decent blood trail should you need it. Not that I needed it here, I saw all of the animals go down but I was not hunting in thick bush.
    I wanted to get some for the 338, as a hog and kudu bush terrain bullet, 220gr at about 2800ft/s.

    Maybe I'll come and test them with you in the off season, let me know.
    "It's not the dying part that scares me, it's the not living."

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •