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  1. #1
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    Default Boer War Firearms

    How about a thread in which to share pics of your Boer War firearms and to share some knowledge about the firearm and its history? Would be great to see what is out there.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Boer War Firearms

    The two most commonly used rifles of the Boer War: the M1896 Mauser and the Lee Enfield Mk I. The Mauser's serial number indicates that it was probably in the shipment which left Germany in the ship Kaiser on the 2nd September, 1896.

    Attachment 30836

  3. #3
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    Default

    Very nice thank you. I will post some
    Pics tom

  4. #4
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    Very nice. Thank you. They certainly make for interesting
    Comparison.

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Boer War Firearms

    This is a Boer Mauser carbine chambered in 7x57. It was part of the second batch of Mauser carbines delivered to the ZAR, marked " Mod. Mauser 1896. Ludw. Loewe & Co Berlin".
    This particular rifle was taken to Britain by a high ranking officer at the end of the Boer War. I acquired the rifle from his grandson approximately three years ago. Unfortunately, he
    could not provide any further details. The rifle is beautifully carved and closely resembles two similar examples which also have the same characteristics. The first being the Bragg mauser which is a long mauser with a shortened fore-end, pistol grip (which allowed for better handling when on horseback) and the OVS and ZAR emblems carved on either side of the stock. The Bragg mauser has a carved head of Paul Kruger at the base of the pistol grip.
    The Bragg Mauser was found in Uganda several years after the Boer war and was subsequently donated to the Boer war museum (Bloemfontein) by Mr D.E Bragg.
    The second is the "Jonson Mauser" which lay undiscovered in the barn on a Victorian farm for 113 years.This rifle belonged to the two Jonson brothers that went to fight in South Africa.
    Pte Jephthah (Jeff) Jonson enlisted with the 4th Victorian Imperial Bushmen and was killed in action at Haarte-Beesfontein on the 18.02.1901.
    His brother Adrias Jonson took the carved mauser carbine back to Australia as a war trophy.
    I have not seen carvings of this quality which so closely resemble each other and am of the opinion that the carvings may very well have been done by the same craftsman.
    It's at times like this that I wish this rifle could speak.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Boer War Firearms

    Finally, I seem to have loaded the pics

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  8. #8

    Default Re: Boer War Firearms

    Magnificent !

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Boer War Firearms

    You have a lovely rifle with an interesting background! Is the stock original and who carved it? I am just somewhat surprised that it has a pistol grip and the “Boer War” is inscribed in English.

    Unfortunately, as a collector concentrating on British rifles of the Boer War, I do not have any with carvings to compare. The British soldier did not own his rifle and would have got into serious trouble had he put a knife to it! On the other hand, regimental markings with a study of regimental history, can sometimes suggest a rifle’s possible background. I’ll start off with this Magazine Lee Metford Mk I* whose markings indicate that it was issued to the 1st battalion of the Devonshire Regiment in 1892. It was eventually found in Lesotho during 1975.

    By the time of the Boer War the LM Mk I* was practically obsolescent but surprisingly these rifles were still on issue to a number of the British regular regiments which took part in its early stages. This rifle probably accompanied the Devonshires when they were sent to South Africa from India in 1899 following their involvement in the Tirah Campaign of 1898. If so, it would have been carried at Elandslaagte and also served through the siege of Ladysmith where it could have possibly been used at Wagon Hill.

    This rifle’s markings and the circumstances of its recovery suggest that later during the Boer War it was probably downgraded to some supporting unit such as the Blockhouse Guards where it was lost or stolen.

    Attachment 30844

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Boer War Firearms

    The stock on the mauser carbine is original. The bottom part of the pistol grip is an add on (as with the other two mausers mentioned). With the "boer war" inscription being in English, I do believe that these mausers were carved as momento's and not by a Boer in the veld. I assume that this rifle was carved after the first phase of the war when most people thought the hostilities were over as it is dated 1901. ( The Boers generally carved the date and month as well as the year).

    The carvings may very well have been done by a Boer POW or a joiner.

    Your Lee Metford seems to be in excellent condition. I have been searching for one for some time but have not found one in fair to good condition.



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