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  1. #11
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    Default Re: The use of a Metronome in pistol dry fire and live fire training

    Quote Originally Posted by KK20 View Post
    I came across this in a knife course sometime back as well.
    Being "in time" and being "fluid" are two different things. I've been trained in a Japanese discipline of Kendo which is extremely formative and exact: you can hit a man in his head with a sword wrong. After a while having some moderate success with the discipline: no more Kendo for me, domo arigato and hold on your crap if you like, but I'm done with this kak. And I hated the fact I can't kick or hit with my fist my opponent even if it was made easy by the opponent (sorry for the bruises, Bobby).

    These "tic toc" type of training methods are just a simplified way of demonstrating the stages of a combination of an execution of a task, but I find them utterly useless after you've made the idea of the combo clear to the student, i.e. this is a tool for initial teaching. After you've got the idea, it's all about making the execution smooth and quick, regardless the rhythm. BTW, the rhythm makes it easier to the opponent to kick your ass... just saying...

    Unless you are the drummer in a band, then the rhythm is everything.

    There are stages in an execution of a combination of movements, but in the end the parts don't take equal amount of time, hence the metronome doesn't make any sense after the very basic training.

    Unless you are training a band of human robots performing to the masses, like the North Koreans do.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: The use of a Metronome in pistol dry fire and live fire training

    Quote Originally Posted by KK20 View Post
    Has anyone here benefited from its use with pistol shooting?
    Anderson says it is good for transition.

    Any feed back?

    Tx
    As far as I recall, Anderson refers to using a metronome to train the trigger finger, not transition.

    So train at for example 250 bpm for 45 secs... see what it feels like. Then up the bpm.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  3. #13
    Member KK20's Avatar
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    Oct 2008
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    my heart at the sea and my soul in the mountains
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    Default Re: The use of a Metronome in pistol dry fire and live fire training

    Something about breaking double taps and improving transitions ..
    live out your imagination , not your history.

  4. #14
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    Jul 2011
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    Default Re: The use of a Metronome in pistol dry fire and live fire training

    I have never used a metronome but do make the noises in my head while shooting i found it very helpfull, we tend to skip a beat while transitioning kinda seeing the transition as a action that needs its own count. When i managed to not skip a beat while transitioning i saw my times improve dramatically

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