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  1. #1
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    Default How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    I'll go first :)

    Hunting in Germany is very unlike hunting in South Africa.

    Right of the bat, Europe does not have the same variety in huntable species as Africa. In my state (Nordrein Westfalen), most hunters will only hunt roe and wild boar. If you are lucky (more about this later) you may have access to red deer, or fallow deer. There is off course also foxes, badgers, and raccoon to shoot and trap.

    There are 4 basic ways in which you can hunt:

    1. There are a few hunting estates in Germany, but it's unaffordable for most people to to hunt there. A decent trophy red deer can set you back 3000€ + in trophy fees. That excludes the day fees, board & lodging and a myriad of other cost that makes these estates super exclusive.

    2. It is possible to hunt on state land. I have not tried this in my own State, but I have hunted in a state forest Bavaria. It's a relatively straight forward process of applying for a permit and choosing the dates. It's also not expensive. The down side, is that you don't get to keep the meat or trophy. If you want it, you can pay for it at a per kg rate. (Head and skin still on).

    3. You can rent a hunting area, called a "Revier".
    As with all things German, it is made unnecessary complicated, with a bunch of rules and regulations. A rental agreement between landowners and a " Pachter" is for a minimum of 9 years.

    As Pachter, you are responsible for maintaining order in the area, as far as game populations go. This also includes being called out to deal with animals hit by cars. You are responsible for the maintenance of high seats and feeders. You are also responsible for any crop damage caused.
    To offset some of the cost, you sell the hunted game to butcheries.

    4. A pachter can also have a certain number of people that hunt for him or her. This is normally done by invitation. If you are lucky, someone may have spot open. You will be required to pay a fee, normally X amount of Euros per hectare. The prices per hectare can increase significantly, if there are red deer, sika deer, mouflon or fallow deer available.

    A muscle sample of each wild boar needs to sent to a vet to get checked out for trichinosis. You will need a green light from the vet before a butcher will accept the meat. If the pig test positive, you have to dispose of it. African Swine Flu is going to be a big problem in coming years. That may change things as well.

    Walk and stalk hunting (Pirsching), is the exception rather than the rule where I live. It may be different in East Germany and Bavaria.

    99.9% of our hunting is done from the high seat. Even in rural areas, there are houses, and road everywhere. Hunting from a high seat enables you to shoot downward, while at the same time having a good idea about safe shooting lanes.

    Stalking is difficult. It is next to impossible to move silently due to all the leaves and sticks that accumulate on the ground. The vegetation can also be really thick at places.

    When I have time later, I'll write a bit about the importance of dogs when hunting in Europe, and how a driven hunt is set up.

  2. #2

    Default Re: How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    Interesting. Thank you

  3. #3
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    Default Re: How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    What calibre do you hunt with?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    Quote Originally Posted by Finkelstein View Post
    What calibre do you hunt with?
    308 Winchester and 30-06 is hugely popular here, as is 8x57.

    I'm currently hunting with a CZ 550 in 308 Winchester (And by hunting, I mean it's been standing in the safe because I haven't gotten around to hunting this season).

    We are limited to 6.5 cal and up with an energy value of 1500 at 100m for red deer and boar.

    We can use 223 / 222 / 243 on fox, badgers, and roe.

    The people who hunt boar on a regular basis prefer faster and bigger calibres

  5. #5

    Default Re: How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    Nice read, I suppose there is no need for heavy calibers like the 9.3 etc, or are the caliber choices more pragmatic?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrushStroke View Post
    Nice read, I suppose there is no need for heavy calibers like the 9.3 etc, or are the caliber choices more pragmatic?
    For high chair hunting, any medium calibre will get the job done. You have a good rest, and you are able to take proper aim.

    Things change with a driven hunt, where the game is running. Another factor to take into account is that wild boar have quite a bit of fat, and thick coat this time of the year. Both of which limits the blood loss.

    Meat damage is of secondary concern. The main concern is to make a clean kill. I've spoken to a hunter that does a lot* of driven boar hunting. His rifle on the day was a Blaser in 9,3x62 shooting 220gr monolithic frangible ammunition (IIRC). He felt that a 300 Win Mag was the minimum he would be happy with. I've got a picture of a 120kg boar that I can't seem to post. They get really big.

    I also know a couple of guys that are very happy wi
    their 308 rifles.

    It comes down to shot placement with quality ammo. I was talked down from buying a 338 Win Mag to the more logical 308 Win.

    *By a lot I mean that he is either divorced, or never married. :)
    Last edited by Socrates; 03-12-2019 at 17:55. Reason: I do not speak the Queen's English excellently anymore

  7. #7
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    Default Re: How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    Thanks for sharing.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Socrates View Post
    For high chair hunting, any medium calibre will get the job done. You have a good rest, and you are able to take proper aim.

    Things change with a driven hunt, where the game is running. Another factor to take into account is that wild boar have quite a bit of fat, and thick coat this time of the year. Both of which limits the blood loss.

    Meat damage is of secondary concern. The main concern is to make a clean kill. I've spoken to a hunter that does a lot* of driven boar hunting. His rifle on the day was a Blaser in 9,3x62 shooting 220gr monolithic frangible ammunition (IIRC). He felt that a 300 Win Mag was the minimum he would be happy with. I've got a picture of a 120kg boar that I can't seem to post. They get really big.

    I also know a couple of guys that are very happy wi
    their 308 rifles.

    It comes down to shot placement with quality ammo. I was talked down from buying a 338 Win Mag to the more logical 308 Win.

    *By a lot I mean that he is either divorced, or never married. :)
    Ok thank you

  9. #9
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    Default Re: How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    I have guided a few German clients on hunts in South Africa and your rituals and respect shown to the hunted animals is wonderful.
    Thanks for sharing.
    Could you maybe explain the traditional ritual and the reasoning behind it to forum members?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: How do you hunt in your part of the world?

    Thank you for sharing.
    live out your imagination , not your history.

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