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  1. #11

    Default Re: Looking at getting my first shotgun

    If it were not frowned on and legal a good semi auto would be the way to go. There is a reason they are so popular in many parts of the world. A Benelli would be amongst the top of the list. They are much softer shooting and as a result you can practice more. I concede that recoil may not bother some. Shotguns like Beretta, Browning and Winchester to name but a few decent brands are difficult to wear out unless abused or shot a lot. If tradition is required in your area then it is impossible to go wrong with a Beretta Silver pigeon. Nothing wrong with a traditional pump either if allowed. Even a Remington 870 pump will likelY outlast you and your girls.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Looking at getting my first shotgun

    Quote Originally Posted by CorditeCrazy View Post
    This about sums it up. For recreational clay and wing shooting an O/U with fixed chokes is all you need.
    Fixed chokes only work if you stick to a certain discipline. For Trap you need Full choke. For Skeet Wide open choke. With Full choke on skeet you will struggle. And on trap an open choke spreads so quick. YOu will be on target doing all correct. But your shot will spread so wide they will pass the clay. As there is to much gaps in the pattern.

    With Sporting clays it depends on how the field is setup on the day. Long Shots or close shots or mixed. Most guys will go full and half. Or half and open.

    For hunting birds. You need mostly half and full. So when you walk and stalk. If a bird jumps up. Your on half choke which will help for the close up shot. As the bird flies away the distance increase and your second shot which is a full choke will help the shot pattern stay tight to hit the target.

    If you sit again and wait for birds to come in. You might need to change up again.
    Fix chokes really limit the application. And later force you to buy another O/U to use in different discipline. A choked O\U opens the doors to any situation.

    And 2nd hand they will pop up from 10 and up.

  3. #13

    Default Re: Looking at getting my first shotgun

    Quote Originally Posted by Againstthegrains View Post
    I have two daughters about whom I have been told will grow up to be real heart breakers, and it has also been suggested by several people that it might be wise to purchase a shotgun I have considered that the only assurance I have they will make wise decisions is by being a perfect, respectful and loving father, and hope that they will have the sense to choose someone like me. I have also figured that if I teach them to shoot, they could probably sort out some of their problem creatures on their own. With that being said, and before I talk myself out of it, I am looking at getting a shot gun to use for guinea fowl, rockies and perhaps some clays as well. I am completely new to this shotgun thing, having only borrowed one on occasion, and never really paid much attention to what I was shooting with, so rather than buy twice, I'm hoping to rather get some good advice from you guys. I come from a rifle hunting background, if that helps to narrow the scope a bit (sorry bad pun).

    I am not into the whole name dropping thing, and couldn't give two hoots if its a hand engraved H &H or its dipped in muddy pink camo, as long as its does what it was meant to do.

    So where to start?

    Is it worth buying second hand? Can you wear out a shot gun? Do they need a whole lot of 'tweaking' like a rifle to get them shooting right?

    Is there a Howa equivalent in shotguns?

    Can you get a bad one?

    What are chokes? should I be bothered about them?
    Quite a lot to go over once you get into this. But if you simply want to get into wing shooting and a reliable field gun that can be used across various disciplines, this is my 2c.
    You can certainly find a good 2nd hand field gun that won't break the bank if you look about, certainly you'd get better value for money on a "good gun" that may be out of your budget as a new model. Also not worth spending a bundle on a shotgun if you don't know what you like - and you won't know what you like until you start getting out and shooting.
    As has already been stated, an O/U is probably the most versatile and widely available and you'll find quite a range, I don't like adjustable chokes on a field gun, but each to their own, if you want to get a fixed choke gun look at 1/4 and 3/4, that should cover most situations. If you're going to be shooting more geese than other birds look for a gun with longer length barrels and you'll mostly be shooting #3's so the 1/4 & 3/4 fixed chokes will still suit you. Guineafowl are not easy generally, probably best with 5's and again the same setup should suit you. Check the fit when the gun is closed - it should be nice and tight, also have a look at the movement once the gun is broken, it shouldn't be loose, safety should be firm (not stiff) and precise. Check the stock too, if it's been dinged about or worked on, it's usually a sign that the gun has been through the mill a bit.
    Once you get into the joys of wingshooting I'm sure it won't be long before you realise that it's not possible (or nearly as fun) without a good pointing dog and that will open up another whole can of worms and chapter of your life that will add great value - nothing quite beats shooting wild greywing over a good pointing dog. Guinea's are notoriously hard to shoot even with a dog and they will cause even the slickest dog to lose its shape.

    So once you have decided on what you like in a shotgun, I'm sure you'll set your sights on something that is a bit more personal and suited to your tastes - the beauty is that there is a wide and varied selection - if you're going to be carrying a gun for days in the field, try and find something that isn't heavy and lumpy, you'll soon learn to hate it.

    Most of all, enjoy the journey it's got immense value.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Looking at getting my first shotgun

    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Gunman View Post
    Do you have Dedicated status? Can you own a semi-auto?
    I didn't initially think of one as an option, but it actually makes sense as a option for a shotgun, as its quick shooting, and lighter than a double barrel for hunting, and they are quite affordable. Is dedicated status essential to license one? For my competency I did bolt action rifle, pistol and shotgun, but not auto.

  5. #15
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Againstthegrains View Post
    I didn't initially think of one as an option, but it actually makes sense as a option for a shotgun, as its quick shooting, and lighter than a double barrel for hunting, and they are quite affordable. Is dedicated status essential to license one? For my competency I did bolt action rifle, pistol and shotgun, but not auto.
    Yes, dedicated status is essential, as it competency for SLR unfortunately. Unless you're happy to do more proficiency training, competency application, and wait, you're limited to O/U or pump etc.

  6. #16
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shooty View Post
    Fixed chokes only work if you stick to a certain discipline. For Trap you need Full choke. For Skeet Wide open choke. With Full choke on skeet you will struggle. And on trap an open choke spreads so quick. YOu will be on target doing all correct. But your shot will spread so wide they will pass the clay. As there is to much gaps in the pattern.

    With Sporting clays it depends on how the field is setup on the day. Long Shots or close shots or mixed. Most guys will go full and half. Or half and open.

    For hunting birds. You need mostly half and full. So when you walk and stalk. If a bird jumps up. Your on half choke which will help for the close up shot. As the bird flies away the distance increase and your second shot which is a full choke will help the shot pattern stay tight to hit the target.

    If you sit again and wait for birds to come in. You might need to change up again.
    Fix chokes really limit the application. And later force you to buy another O/U to use in different discipline. A choked O\U opens the doors to any situation.

    And 2nd hand they will pop up from 10 and up.
    Yes for sure, that’s why I said for recreational clay and wing shooting it perfect. Also if you start to get into it then you can get a other gun, and that’s never a bad thing 😬

    Ive been using my fixed choked S56E with fixed full and modified chokes for over a decade. Most of my clay shooting is trap and sporting and it works just great as a field gun. But my shooting is recreational (prior to lockdown I shot about 1 round of clays per month on average). Scores varied but they weren’t atrocious and I had a blast
    Don’t take life too seriously, no one gets out alive.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Looking at getting my first shotgun

    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Gunman View Post
    Yes, dedicated status is essential, as it competency for SLR unfortunately. Unless you're happy to do more proficiency training, competency application, and wait, you're limited to O/U or pump etc.
    SLR competency is not required for a semi auto shotgun.
    Cattle die, kindred die, every man is mortal:
    But I know one thing that never dies,
    the glory of the great dead.
    Havamal

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP View Post
    SLR competency is not required for a semi auto shotgun.
    News to me! Good to know, thanks.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Looking at getting my first shotgun

    Quote Originally Posted by SSP View Post
    SLR competency is not required for a semi auto shotgun.
    But you still need dedicated status?

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