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  1. #11
    User
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Western Cape
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    2,480

    Default Re: Biltong: wet vs dry method

    Quote Originally Posted by Keepleft View Post
    I assume the wet method would work better in the case of freezer burn, rehydrating the meat.
    I have been trying to cure mine in the fridge lately and it gives an even cure. Maybe a bit of fridge curing before freezing will help for freezer burn.
    I do it by taking it off the drier when the outside is hard and inside soft and putting it in a icecream tub in the fridge. It can last months like this and it cures so that the outside and inside have the same colour and hardness.
    .

  2. #12
    User
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Jnb
    Age
    46
    Posts
    1,166

    Default Re: Biltong: wet vs dry method

    Quote Originally Posted by Kev123 View Post
    Out of interest, what effect does the sugar have?
    Personal dislike for the amount of sugar we consume. Why does a savoury treat have sugar.....

    I found sugar added no flavour and it all did was add unhealthy carbs.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #13
    User
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Pretoria
    Age
    34
    Posts
    210

    Default Re: Biltong: wet vs dry method

    Interesting feedback, thanks everyone for your comments.

    It seems it's not always wet or dry, but varying degrees of "wetness". Interesting that there are opposing views as well (some rest in vinegar mix, others say to not submerge in vinegar).

    It's clear that there isn't a right or wrong answer, but personal preference. The reason I was interested in this, is that sometimes my biltong comes out a bit salty (I use crown safari spice). I have found the longer I leave it to rest before hanging, the saltier it is.

    I make 1-2kgs at a time. I cut different thicknesses of meat and have the fan on for about 2 days, until it forms the hard outer crust. Then I turn the fan off and let it continue to dry slowly, eating the thinner pieces first, giving the thicker pieces time to further dry out slowly.

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