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  1. #1
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    Default Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    So as not to hijack the Desert Fox's post in the reloading thread.

    https://www.gunsite.co.za/forums/sho...33#post1440733

    I have a lot of respect for driepootx's knowledge, experience and also his willingness to help fellow reloaders. But I, respectfully, do not agree with his statement that a 130gr expanding monolithic bullet is a better choice as a hunting bullet in the .308 win than a 150gr expanding mono bullet, as suggested by GS Customs.

    While I have very little experience with the .308 win, I have used expanding mono bullets (Barnes X/ TSX/TTSX, Hornady GMX and Peregrine VRG4/VLR4) in a 1 in 10 twist .300 win mag,
    on a lot of game. I have tried these bullets in 150gr, 165gr and 180gr and have always gone back to the 180gr weight. Accuracy was equally good with the different weights and while penetration with the 150gr bullets was good enough for general hunting, the 180gr bullets performed better on large animals when thick bone and/or muscle was hit from challenging angles.

    I have also used monolithic expanding bullets in the 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.5x55 SE, 7x57, 9.3x62 and .375 H&H and have never experienced problems with accuracy or terminal performance at normal hunting ranges with heavier bullets, even with the 9.3x62 shooting a 250gr Hornady GMX at 2450fps or the .375 H&H shooting a 300gr Peregrine VRG3 at 2400 fps.

    Maybe some other users of monolithic expanding bullets can share their experience here.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    Following this, I have always favoured a heavier bullet for hunting, so 180gr in my 308, but I’ve never loaded mono metal Bullets for that calibre. But I’m assuming that the added weight will aid with penetration as much with mono’s as with bonded/cup & core?
    Don’t take life too seriously, no one gets out alive.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    Currently use 175gr Balistix HunTac in my 300WM with fantastic results. Single digit ES with lovex S070 provides sub MOA groups.

    I only push this bullet at 2900 ft/s and feel that there is no need to chase more speed as max hunting range for me is 400m in the plains. Here is a pic of a recovered bullet which entered the front (chest) of a BW slightly quartering to at 305m. Bullet was recovered under the skin near the hip bone on. Absolutely destroyed the lungs and BW made it maybe 20m. If I remember correctly, 99% bullet retention.

    I have only ever recovered 2 bullets in this format, the rest have been complete pass throughs with quick expiration.

    Personally I would always go heavier than lighter as monolithic bullets don't just break up.

    Sent from my ELS-NX9 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    I shoot 150 Barnes TTSX in my 308 CZ 601 ,1 in 12 twist and they group under 1 inch.

    Sent from my SM-G985F using Tapatalk

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    Quote Originally Posted by Greekboi95 View Post
    Currently use 175gr Balistix HunTac in my 300WM with fantastic results. Single digit ES with lovex S070 provides sub MOA groups.

    I only push this bullet at 2900 ft/s and feel that there is no need to chase more speed as max hunting range for me is 400m in the plains. Here is a pic of a recovered bullet which entered the front (chest) of a BW slightly quartering to at 305m. Bullet was recovered under the skin near the hip bone on. Absolutely destroyed the lungs and BW made it maybe 20m. If I remember correctly, 99% bullet retention.

    I have only ever recovered 2 bullets in this format, the rest have been complete pass throughs with quick expiration.

    Personally I would always go heavier than lighter as monolithic bullets don't just break up.

    Sent from my ELS-NX9 using Tapatalk
    Awesome!!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    I have recovered quite a few 375cal 250gr Barnes TTSX bullets out of Buffalo.
    Bullets mostly look perfect, with weight retention 98% or so.
    I used the 250gr bullets as I was told to use one weight lower than a conventional cup and core bullet when comparing a mono. I couldn't find a 270gr at the time, so took the 250gr.
    I am shooting them at 2600fps.

    The combination really works well for me, but I must admit, my first choice for Buffalo is hands down still a 300gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw or Swift A Frame. I cannot prove or explain, but to me it just seems that they hit harder
    A roaring Lion kills no game

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    Quote Originally Posted by MyLani View Post
    I have recovered quite a few 375cal 250gr Barnes TTSX bullets out of Buffalo.
    Bullets mostly look perfect, with weight retention 98% or so.
    I used the 250gr bullets as I was told to use one weight lower than a conventional cup and core bullet when comparing a mono. I couldn't find a 270gr at the time, so took the 250gr.
    I am shooting them at 2600fps.

    The combination really works well for me, but I must admit, my first choice for Buffalo is hands down still a 300gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw or Swift A Frame. I cannot prove or explain, but to me it just seems that they hit harder
    I have recovered Barnes TSX 270gr and 300gr Peregrine VRG-3 .375 bullets from buffalo and while both worked, the Peregrines did penetrate better.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    Quote Originally Posted by TStone View Post
    I have recovered Barnes TSX 270gr and 300gr Peregrine VRG-3 .375 bullets from buffalo and while both worked, the Peregrines did penetrate better.
    That would make sense as they are heavier and don't expand as much as the Barnes.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    Another aspect is velocity to expand optimally. Couple a years a go I was walking through the stalls. Frontier and two others insisted on a lighter weight for the 308 as their products needed a minimum of 2000fps to expand . Peregrine was the only one who said their product does not depend on velocity to expand . They recommended the 150 or 165gr .

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Monolithic Expanding Bullets, Weight and Velocity.

    People get confused on the subject because there is a whole heap of variables that comes into play, but when you sit and think about it logically it’s really quite simple.

    Now when people started making mono’s, they of course ran into the trouble of firstly trying to stabilize them, but more importantly getting the composition and nose cavity design correct in order to get optimal expansion. To calculate stability is the easiest thing in the world, so that should not be a factor at all, but copper is hard, I would venture a guess that by far the single biggest reason people advised to drop a bullet weight in copper is to get the speed up, so that the bullets open reliably.

    This unfortunately stuck with many people, but in reality it’s only applicable when you deal with specific bullets. To say one 165gr mono bullet won’t open up because another brand did not is incorrect, bullets all differ and act differently under certain impact velocities.

    You can go light with mono’s, because of their penetration potential, but forget not the heavier a bullet the more material, the more material the greater the potential of the nose cavity size, aka how big the bullet can open up when it expands, and that governs how big a permanent wound cavity can be created. If this was not so then we would shoot solids, but we don’t, we need that big frontal area.

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