Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Drill Press

  1. #1

    Default Drill Press

    I have posted before about the usefulness of a small drill press for the hobbyist. A LOT more can be done with a drill press than with a hand held drill. Try drilling a 10mm hole in a piece of steel with a hand held drill. Or even a 6mm, and if you manage that you'll find that you can't open it up with a 10mm because it will stick. My little Ryobi bench top drill press will drill 12mm through steel with artistic ease, and the hole will be round, straight and perpendicular to the surface of the steel. If you need to drill more than one hole in steel or wood at a particular spacing a drill press is the only way you'll do it accurately, assuming that good accuracy is required.

    Relative to it's capability and general usefulness a small drill press is the best value in machine tools or power tools. I've done some unusual things with mine. I have an RCBS die lock ring that had broken its pinch screw. It was a tiny screw, about 3mm so we can be sure it was eighth inch. Eighth inch cap screws are unobtainable in SA but I had some 4mm which is much stronger being nearly double the sectional area. But the socket head was too big for the lock ring. I drilled and tapped a 4mm hole in a piece of scrap, cut a slit with a hacksaw for clamping, all quite crude but adequate for holding the screw in my small machine vise. I mounted a grinding point of cylinder shape about 40mm dia x 25 thick in the chuck. That could be lowered in a controlled contact with the screw head to grind a small flat. Because the work holder was rectangular I could grind four flats accurately, then the other four between. If it is done carefully the result is a perfect octagon which can be used as it is or finished perfectly round with a needle file and abrasive paper. I could have cut the flats by filing, but the drill press made it easier and more accurate.

    Now I had to drill out the existing tapped hole in the lock ring and tap it M4. Would have been awkward by hand but it was easy in the drill press. The best way to reduce the diameter of a cap screw head is of course in a lathe but the job was done to near perfection with a cheap drill press.

    Admittedly that's an unusual example but it does illustrate the point. Whether to buy one obviously depends on the need. Obviously not for one job unless its a big one or can't be done any other way. But its worth it if you use it only occasionally but from time to time. They are normally about R2400. A couple of days ago I saw two Ryobi in Cash Crusaders, bottom of Main Street Somerset West. They were priced R1000 and R1500. The 1500 had the rectangular blue belt cover like mine. The 1000 had a green round ended belt cover and the on/off switch in a different place. They were exactly the same size and both looked brand new. I can think of no reason for the price difference, but the R1000 one was a bargain.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Drill Press

    I first had a very cheap one from Checkers Hyper.

    The sold and got the fancier Bosch one with Digital display. Sold also.

    Now have the Martlet 900w Semi industrial . Way over kill for my needs but so handy and alot of power on hand. And takes up to 22mm chuck.

    Went further and bought a small lathe over 2ndhand. The smallest MacAfric one. And the two together is amazing. Ive made my own sizer and small parts.

  3. #3
    User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Durban
    Age
    47
    Posts
    2,411

    Default Re: Drill Press

    Quote Originally Posted by shooty View Post
    I first had a very cheap one from Checkers Hyper.

    The sold and got the fancier Bosch one with Digital display. Sold also.

    Now have the Martlet 900w Semi industrial . Way over kill for my needs but so handy and alot of power on hand. And takes up to 22mm chuck.

    Went further and bought a small lathe over 2ndhand. The smallest MacAfric one. And the two together is amazing. Ive made my own sizer and small parts.
    Next up should be a mill or a mill drill. I sold my floor mounted drill press after getting a mill drill. Needed more for space and the drill press was not getting any use.

    Sent from my SM-S908E using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    User
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Stella
    Age
    45
    Posts
    10,594

    Default Re: Drill Press



    I have one of these, fully equipped and functional. Just waiting for Eskom to blow the last breath

    https://www.artstation.com/artwork/eazKEG


    Serious though, a drill press in a workshop/garage is much like a good knife in your pocket: after a few days, one doesn't know how one lived without it.

  5. #5
    User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Vaal Triangle
    Age
    54
    Posts
    2,639

    Default Re: Drill Press

    Your thread timing is perfect because I got hold of a Rexon RDM 100A drill press earlier this week. The problem I have is that the table is missing (but the arm is there) and it short a chuck but further it looks in a not too bad state.
    Where might I be able to find a table? Otherwise I thought of getting a piece of pipe weld it onto a 12mm plate and then mount a vice on it. Any better ideas?

  6. #6
    User
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Age
    48
    Posts
    189

    Default Re: Drill Press

    A table can be made as you suggest, just beef it up with stifferners between the upper and lower plates. A clamp can be done with pipe and M12 bolt and nuts. Weld it up and there you go.

  7. #7
    User
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Right next to the pot that needs stirring.
    Age
    44
    Posts
    1,873

    Default Re: Drill Press

    I cannot find the video now. But I have seen one a while ago on TikTok or Whatsapp or somewhere where a drill press is used to load AK47 ammo! They don't weigh the propellant, scoop the brass full and then seat the bullets. They have made dies that bolt onto the platform and others that fit in the chuck. So there is another use for you.

  8. #8
    User
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Centurion
    Age
    47
    Posts
    1,658

    Default Re: Drill Press

    Agreed.. I put mine on the slowest belt, chuck a bronze brush in and clean the necks of cases quick quick.. Also works for trimming cases with those Lee cutters (just wear some gloves)..

  9. #9
    User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Durban
    Age
    47
    Posts
    2,411

    Default Re: Drill Press

    Quote Originally Posted by pblaauw View Post
    Agreed.. I put mine on the slowest belt, chuck a bronze brush in and clean the necks of cases quick quick.. Also works for trimming cases with those Lee cutters (just wear some gloves)..
    Just a warning. Never wear gloves with machine tools. They have a habit of being caught in the spinny part and pulling you into the machine.

    On a drill press it will probably break your hand or possibly remove it (depending on the torque of the machine). On something like a lathe or mill it has been known to pull you into the machine and make you one with the workpiece, pretty much beating the operator to death.

    Gloves actually have no place in a workshop, if you don't believe me do some research yourself.
    For that matter neither does loose clothing or long hair (plenty a woman has been scalped by machine tools)

    Sent from my SM-S908E using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    User
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Stella
    Age
    45
    Posts
    10,594

    Default Re: Drill Press

    Does anyone know where I can get a replacement table for a drill press?

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •