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Thread: Malidutch

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Malidutch

    Heyto, she has a good build and I like the colour.

    Looks like she is almost taller than the Shepherd. She must be close to 30kg?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meteor View Post
    Heyto, she has a good build and I like the colour. Looks like she is almost taller than the Shepherd. She must be close to 30kg?
    Haven’t weighed her in ages, but probably closer to 25kgs.EDIT: and funny, I’m feeding them stuff that would’ve been on the bottom of my list in SA. Best food I’ve found in Malawi is Montego. With supplementation of meat, their doing good.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Malidutch



    My phone made a video/memory of the day of training. I didn’t take a lot footage, bit will take more next time. That brick at the end of the video is one of many bricks of marijuana the confiscated with the help of the dogs at borders, roadblocks and airports. I’ve never held a brick of weed before so now I can tick that off.

    We’ll train again next week and I might take my GSD with to sharpen uo his biting again. He is a defensive biter and doesn’t go out and look for the bite like my Dutchie does.

    I was impressed at how well kept the dogs are and how clean the kennels and dogs were. They get dipped weekly and seems well fed. Unfortunately I assume with limited funding the quality of the dogs are not as great as it could be. There were a few spectacular dogs, the sable GSD at the end of the video being one, coming from SA. Will ask Dave Harris at some stage if it is one of his.

    I’ve been in contact with Jose from Josie’s K9 and will be brining up a few items for them when I visit SA in July.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Malidutch

    I don’t know how to share videos, so I’ll link my IG. This was today. I’m super happy with her performance.

    SSP, DrDave and other members with experience in this field, I’d like to hear your thoughts. At this stage we’re flying blind and I’m mot experienced enough to know if we’re doing stuff wrong.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/COmnhFOF...=1lla61dc4ivcy

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Malidutch

    Quote Originally Posted by FantomBadger View Post
    I don’t know how to share videos, so I’ll link my IG. This was today. I’m super happy with her performance.

    SSP, DrDave and other members with experience in this field, I’d like to hear your thoughts. At this stage we’re flying blind and I’m mot experienced enough to know if we’re doing stuff wrong.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/COmnhFOF...=1lla61dc4ivcy
    Its hard to see from the video exactly what the dog is doing on the bite.

    However, you need to work on targeting. The first two bites were misses, but I am not certain whether that was intentional. I would put the dog back on a sleeve and get the targeting right before the suit.

    Most handlers want their dogs on a suit way too soon. It leads to weak targeting and weak grips.

    The decoy needs work. Being a decoy is more than just being dumb enough to let a dog bite you. He needs to bounce around less, present the target better and work the dog in the bite more. By this I mean, he needs to touch the dog, release pressure to get a rebite and swing the dog around less. Being able to swing the dog when you first catch is important but not necessary when the dog is on the bite. It can lead to grip slipping and injury. The decoy needs to interact with the dog a great deal in the bite and before it.

    The handler needs to back up the dog more. He looks like he is taking the dog for a casual walk. Energy travels up and down the lead. The handler needs to put back tension on the lead. That will give rise to a sensation of the sleeve or suit slipping which will make the dog rebite and grip harder. Encouragement both verbal, without using the dog's name, and physical is essential.

    Let the dog drag the handler up to the decoy to get a bite. That builds frustration and leads to harder hits and bites.

    Lastly, unless you are actually trying to teach the out in a particular evolution let the dog win the sleeve or article. He gets to keep it for as long as he will carry it in his mouth. That teaches article possession and gives the dog a sense of victory.

    It is clear that the dog works heavily in prey drive. This is great because its the easiest drive to channel in a bite dog. Later, with a more experienced decoy you can start bringing in light defensive and civil work. The dog clearly wants to do the work and is having a good time doing it. The last point is what many people, especially organizations like the SPCA, don't understand. Dogs of this type want to do this kind of work. The high drive ones live for it.

    The SPCA won't let you adopt a dog, including the police dog program "washouts" that they dump twice a year, if you are going to work it.
    Cattle die, kindred die, every man is mortal:
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  6. #16
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    Default Re: Malidutch

    Quote Originally Posted by FantomBadger View Post
    I was impressed at how well kept the dogs are and how clean the kennels and dogs were. They get dipped weekly and seems well fed. Unfortunately I assume with limited funding the quality of the dogs are not as great as it could be.
    This is good to hear and sounds better than how institutional working dogs are treated here. The JMPD let retired working dogs starve to death in their kennels and a Dutch vendor recently took back a few hundred k worth of dogs from the police because their feet were rotting in the kennels because the kennels had two inches of shit covering the floors. This is with a State vet being stationed at the kennels.

    On the dog quality, I'd be willing to bet its a training deficit as much as a genetic one.
    Cattle die, kindred die, every man is mortal:
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    the glory of the great dead.
    Havamal

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Malidutch

    Thanks a lot for the content. Quite a mouth full and lot to consider.

    I counted one miss, the snapping was at the build up and she lunged. However at the bite command, she did miss as the decoy didn’t clearly present an arm and she grabbed what she could get.

    I assume he is still green and learning. He got a bit carried away and dragged the dog around to much, to the point where is was difficult reaching her to stroke and encourage her. It might have been soft, but I was constantly praising and encouraging her. We are training specifically for the out command at this stage. Her reward is to have another bite or a toy at the end of the session. So she still wins in a sense. I’ll work on backing her more and being more into it. I also agree that targeting is more important at this stage.

    My GSD can work in defense drive, she is still young at 2 and a half so I’m not too worried, but definitely only prey drive, tail position and no hair standing up on her neck as when she gets pissed.

    IG has a way of cropping the videos silly and it cuts off.

    Again thank you for the comments and typing a thorough reply. At this stage I’m just happy to have found a place where I can my dog again to do what she is good at.

    EDIT: missed replying to the lead tension. Thank you this is very important.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Malidutch

    I don't bother with the out until the bite is solid. You also don't need to work on a suit to train that. If you are going to work on an out, and generally, work the dog on the bite for a shorter time. Don't let the dog get tired or bored on the bite. Also don't keep the timing the same, otherwise the dog will start to anticipate the out.

    Rewarding the dog for an out with another high value toy is essential. I generally reward the out with another bite. In reality, this may be necessary.

    As to the decoy, is he teaching himself or do they have an experienced decoy that trains them?

    Good on you for putting in the work.
    Cattle die, kindred die, every man is mortal:
    But I know one thing that never dies,
    the glory of the great dead.
    Havamal

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Malidutch

    The decoys get instructed what to do from the officer running the training, the most senior one there.

    A 3 odd day seminar with a good trainer out of SA would do them the world’s good. I can unfortunately not sponsor something to that extend. Maybe that’s a good crowdfunding idea. I’m speaking to Jose from Josies K9 and will be buying a sleeve from him in July that I’ll be donating here. I’m not paying anything so I feel that is a kind trade.

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Malidutch

    I figured the stupid cropping out. This should be much better.

    Thanks.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/COt0Y19F...=1qqke1gy82086

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