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  1. #21

    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    treman,
    Too True! And, not one damned call from hollywood either. The local gun club won't even return my calls!
    Excellent comment about "Hollywood, Africa and GunSite".
    Cheers, Brian

  2. #22

    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    Wesley, I am waiting to hear about your buffalo hunts and see your videos. I'm sure it would be quite telling, as are your above posts.

    I see that you posted over 2000 times on GunSite. I can not imagine what it would be like to read that many of your posts.

    Brian. aka Abrum

  3. #23

    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    FFournie, You ask good questions.
    I don't want to get into the subject in any depth on GunSite.

    Here is an introduction to what concerns me.

    American hunters are good at snatching failure from the jaws of success. They, like the Brits of old, spoil things. They move into area/country like a plague and ruin it until it become like their country. If you don't agree with this, do some research. I offer it as a cautionary note from Canada.

    Remember recently when South African farms ceased being called farms and became "ranches". When it happened I told my South African friends that they would rue the day. It is the beginning of the Americanization of South African Hunting. They all looked at me strangely.

    Mostly, Americans see the South African bush and the animals as a giant shopping mall. They arrive in JB and are taken straight to the guest house and then straight to the fancy hunting lodge where the are led through the bush to do their shopping. They return to the USA by the same route. Safari hunting, especially in South Africa is consumer tourism that has hit the wall. Most of North American consumers in your market learns as little as possible about the land, it's history and people. That means that they consume as little as possible too. They never visit a battle field, museum, rugby game or take a tour of Soweto. (And like most White South Africans they don't go to the Apartheid Museum either). Many travelling hunters that go to South Africa are a fearful isolated people and endeavour to keep it that. They do not take the whole of RSA to heart.

    I know that people here on GunSite won't like this but one day it will be proven, one way or the other. I think that the South African Hunting Industry is at a peak and in the process of dropping the ball.

    The worst part is what the South Africa Hunting industry does with this market. The American are who they are. I live in Canada. I love Americans but never forget that they are consumers, as much of the whole world is to varying degrees.

    The South African Hunting Industry must manage this international market according to it's own values to make it grow and last. There is so much more you could do with the hunting market by simply integrating it more into your other attractions, goods and services which includes your culture and history. The RSA hunting industry is being run like a big, but separate, commercial sideshow. You are letting the Americans dictate values to the industry and that is how South African will be diminished. It won't be the first time it happened. Read the News? I have seen it before and it is a sad thing.

    The Hunting Industry must keep it's head or it will lose it's soel. Africa has given much of their other substance of value, like the minerals, to foreigner. ( Caada has long done the same thing with our natural resources and it pisses me off). You still have control of your Outdoor Recreation Industry, as we call it in Canada. Nurture it. Your parks are awesome. Keep the ball moving. Share more of your great country with the hunter. I think that your portal to the world and continued success will include the South African Tour industry. My friend in Canada/USA who have taken long guided tours in South Africa. come back enlighten and completely swept off their feet by you awesome county. They also think that African Hunting is an exclusive, separate and evil thing. Go Figure!

    Sorry, I went over top there. The subject is important to me, anywhere in the world. I don't want to get involve in a big debate/conversation on a hunting website. I've tried that elsewhere and it just becomes a race to to the lowest common denominator!

    I am a traveling hunter making a suggestion because I care about the topic. It's still your show, not mine. Brian

  4. #24

    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    Here is a a small part of an article on the subject. Interesting sort of. Brian


    Possibilities for Improving the Trophy Hunting Industry in Africa

    When Namibia achieved independence from South Africa in 1990, game populations were at historic lows (Martin). In an eort to encour- age a rebound in both wildlife and nonhunting- related tourism, the new government organized rural populations into communities to control vast areas of land, which were restocked with game. Each community was vested with the right to manage its own wildlife resources (Mar- tin). Naidoo et al. investigated the benefits of the hunting industry on seventy-seven commu- nal conservancies in Namibia between 1998 and 2013 and found that trophy hunting can benefit


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    both locals and wildlife (Naidoo 628). Namibia’s method of conservation, which is centred around local indigenous communities, supplies salaries for conservation employees, money for commu- nity projects, and meat to local families when an animal is hunted(632). Between the years of 2011 and 2013, hunting generated 5.41 million dollars in revenue for Namibian locals (636).
    Namibia demonstrates that trophy hunting can improve the wellbeing of local human and animal populations in Africa. However, this is only possible when conservation organizations neglect the current utilitarian approaches to wildlife protection that “favour the rich, power- ful, and foreign at the expense of local commu- nities” (Naidoo 629). For this to occur, North American trophy hunters must abandon their neo-colonial ideologies of Africa. Wildlife must no longer be seen merely as trophies, but as liv- ing organisms in a dynamic environment. The African continent must not be seen as some sort of unadulterated ‘Eden’ (Hubschle 440), but as a complex set of ecosystems, interwoven with many nations, each of whom have their own de- sires, leaderships, and histories. Indigenous peo- ples must also be viewed in a dierent light, no longer as just guides in the hunt (Whittle 196), or mere obstacles to conservation. Instead, they must be treated as human beings and in- cluded in the trophy hunting narrative. After all, they are often the best suited to protect and care for the lands and wildlife of Africa, for it is what many indigenous communities have been doing for thousands of years (Beinhart et al. 59). Though the trophy hunting indus- try is clearly riddled with flaws, the potential for fostering a more sustainable industry exists. With “scientifically determined wildlife popula- tion estimates, comprehensive quotas which are enforced, reputable and honest outfitters, trans- parent and accountable revenue collection and disbursement mechanisms, competent manage- ment and oversight of the industry, and fair dis- tribution of proceeds at the local level” (Baker 319), trophy hunting can become a tool for con- servation. Though above all else, it is crucial for

    trophy hunters to become more educated about the implications of their involvement in African aairs. It is only then that they should use their voices and put their money toward better- ing their sport.
    Many of these suggestions for improving the hunting industry can be seen in the case of Namibia, where trophy hunting has had positive impact on animal populations, indigenous peo- ples, and the economy. Through the adoption of community-based natural resource management (CBNRM), rural communities and conservation eorts have been funded and developed by the trophy hunting industry (Nelson and Agrawal 558). According to Nelson and Agrawal, “The premise underlying CBNRM reforms is that sus- tainable management is most likely where local users are able to manage and extract benefits from natural resources” (558-559). In fact, “CB- NRM eorts are a response to the reality that many cases of rural resource degradation oc- cur because centralized management regimes in African states are often de facto open access regimes” (559). Namibian policymakers have found that “vesting local users with rights to manage, use or own resources is. . . a key correc- tive” to these centralized management systems which have been proven so problematic in the past, and continue to damage countless African nations (559). The case of Namibia illustrates that CBNRM reforms are a powerful tool for in- digenous peoples to be engaged with their land once again. In this way, CBNRM reforms help to combat neo-colonial attitudes and the power narrative that exists in the trophy hunting in- dustry.
    Conclusion
    In the vast majority of cases, the modern tro- phy hunting industry in Africa, and its model for addressing issues in wildlife conservation, are ineective. The rules and laws surround- ing hunting are poorly regulated, and many are based on miscalculations and misunderstand- ings of animals and their behaviours. Hunting revenue frequently funds corrupt governments,


    43



    as opposed to furthering conservation eorts. Even when conservation eorts are practiced, they frequently come at the cost of displac- ing local indigenous populations. The major- ity of these issues are rooted in colonial systems, which have evolved into modern neo-colonial be- haviours that hinder the trophy hunting indus- try’s success.
    However, this does not mean that there is no hope for improvements. Aldo Leopold, ecol- ogist and hunter in the early twentieth century, is admired by many modern-day trophy hunters (Simon 20). Leopold believed that the greatest threat to conservation is the trophy hunter who, in order to enjoy his sport, feels the need to “pos- sess, invade, [and] appropriate” (30). Instead,

    Leopold recommended, “the weaker interests of trophy hunters should be subordinated to hu- manity’s stronger interests in wilderness preser- vation and... the ‘biotic right’ of other[s] to exist in their natural states” (Simon 25). This is incredibly relevant to the twenty-first century trophy hunting industry in Africa. Today, if tro- phy hunters see the wellbeing of others, both hu- mans and animals alike, beyond their own self- interests, they can abandon their neo-colonial tendencies. When this occurs, the trophy hunt- ing industry may become a powerful force in the protection of wildlife, while allowing local African populations to have autonomy over, and thrive in, the savannah they call home.



  5. #25
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    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    Abrum

    It is as always interesting to hear the views of overseas hunters about South Africa, but then the most noticeable thing for me about the views is that they mostly do not understand South African hunters at all. All that while South African hunters don’t understand each other either.

    Firstly, the Africa as viewed by overseas hunters does not exist, that is only the sales pitch, we do not hunt the way as in portrayed in the media. Take the activity you like most, buff hunting, we don’t do that, we don’t hunt buff. Sure you get the odd rich guy here and there that does, but if you go statistically then SA hunters do not hunt dangerous game, I would say less than 1% does.

    That is the first problem, the second problem is SA is very big, and very sparsely populated. Most humans live around the big cities, and this will most likely also be the first contact point for overseas hunters. Even in this forum, I bet most members are from Gauteng, the province Johannesburg is situated in. And most hunters will hunt the “bushveld”, that is the most discussed hunting environment, since most people live there.

    But, drive away from the urban nonsense, suddenly you will start driving in areas where there are precious few people. Many parts of the western freestate, many parts of the eastern cape, and most parts of the northern cape, if you drive there you see mostly nothing, there are no cities, or anything, just small little towns every few hundred kilometres. SA is a semi-arid environment, you would have seen this in Namibia, it’s really not a very friendly environment to live in. As such you will see the biggest populations are along the coast, where it’s not too dry or too cold, or further up north, but inland, next time just do a holiday not a hunt, drive the whole country and see what is what.

    Now hunting and game farms, or ranches or whatever people would want to call it.
    I don’t hunt in them, and none of my friends hunt in them, and I bet statistically most SA hunters don’t even hunt in them either. The same way I hate Gauteng and won’t even visit there for free. I don’t go to Soweto or give a shit about the apartheid museum, I wasn’t part of that.

    You see Abrum I grew up hunting, I started shooting soon after I could walk, have been hunting since then every year of my life, shooting much more than most. The biggest fallacy overseas people, or city folk in SA believe is animals survive on game farms, or because of game farms, that is nonsense. Game farms had a definite influence in generating large amounts of game, but for a specific market, not for us south africans. Statistically none of us hunt the so-called exotic animals, or dangerous game for that matter. We have a thread here where people post their hunting photo’s, check it out, mostly just normal antelope and stuff, nothing fancy. We mostly just read about buff stories in the media, or from people like yourself, which begs the question if you understand this is not our reality?

    So about them yanks, whom wants to treat us like a shopping mall, I couldn’t care less about that. There really is nothing for them to ruin, will they ruin something created specifically for them? Or let me put it this way, even if ALL the game farms vanished tomorrow I would still hunt as normal, nothing would change in my life in any way. ONLY in game farms are animals like kudu fenced in and locked up, in the rest of the country they roam freely, so a game farm is just a slaughter house for them, not some haven. FFS my brother have kudu come and eat on his lawn at night, in the middle of the karoo!

    Just about the ONLY thing hunters in SA, and the world over should be working towards, is letting others do what they want, not infringe in any rights, that’s about it.

  6. #26

    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    Messor, I find your post weirdly off topic and irrelevant. Abrum

  7. #27
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    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    Quote Originally Posted by Abrum View Post
    Messor, I find your post weirdly off topic and irrelevant. Abrum
    ****************
    Messor said :
    It is as always interesting to hear the views of overseas hunters about South Africa, but then the most noticeable thing for me about the views is that they mostly do not understand South African hunters at all. All that while South African hunters don’t understand each other either.
    **********
    I think he meant and proved what he said, lack of understanding and that the American perception of Africa is mostly game farms and pretty much caged hunting. A slaughter house with personalized methods - bow, rifle or what ever.
    Least - thats how I see his post,not free range open velt walk and stalk as we know/like it, but caged fenced animals fot picking off if you can afford the price which is driven by foreigners and making Africa unaffordable for Africans.
    My words are not directed at you or your fellow countryman, - YOU ARE DOING EXACTLY WHAT I WOULD IF I WERE YOU, but ya it sucks to see my country side fenced more and more and more in the name of Game Farms. We need balance - we really need to start implementing some balance in all aspects.

  8. #28

    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    Sounds like you didn't read or understood the post that you are responding to. Like you just read a line or two and then started talking. Weirdly off topic. I give up. Abrum

  9. #29

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    Messor, have you ever hunted outside of South Africa? Or do you just refer to your perfect farm where everything is as it should be? Your condescending posts about people you know little about, and self gratuitous rants, can be very offensive. I know you like to portray yourself as the Chuck Norris of hunting, but a little humility might be nice from time to time.

  10. #30
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    Default Re: buffalo hunting video is in YouTube. Google, Mkulu Hunting Safaris by Brian Gallupp

    So let me get this right, in post 23# Abrum spends a very large amount of time warning us about the dangers of the way the Americans operate, and how WE should be wary about it.

    And then I try and explain to him that our market is basically catering for them, and the reality for the man on the street in SA, and how the two concepts differ.

    And then I am firstly told by Abrum that my input is irrelevant and off topic, so I am not allowed to respond to anything he’s got to say? Me, just about the only person defending his video in the first place in this thread, the others talking about how they don’t like it?

    And no, to that other person, still not responding to your posts, I know it eats you up inside but stop trying it’s pathetic.

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